Best-Kept 14 Secrets Of Professional Painters.

14 Painting Secrets the Pros Won’t Tell You — by ‘Brett Martin @ popularmechanics’. Here are a few tricks of the trade we’ve assembled that homeowners can learn to ease the way. Put professional painter’s tips to work and you’ll notice a glowing difference in your paint job.

Painting shouldn’t be mysterious, secretive, or even difficult. Many people choose to paint their own home, and that is fine. Painting can be a hard job, but with these painting secrets you’ll find it won’t be quite so difficult.

Many thanks to author ‘Brett Martin @ popularmechanics’.

 

Professional painters are fast, efficient, and have mastered techniques that produce top-notch results while making painting look easy. Each painter has slightly different methods and preferences, but the pros all know the trade secrets, and PM hung out with them and watched them work to gather these 13 tips….Brett Martin

Sand Away Flaws

You have to start with a perfectly smooth surface to end up with perfectly painted walls or woodwork. One pro tells PM that sander would be a more fitting job title than painter since he spends so much time pushing sandpaper. Sanding levels outs spackle or joint-compound patches and flattens ridges around nail holes. Sanding also removes burrs and rough spots in your trim. Sand the walls from the baseboard to the ceiling with fine grit sanding paper on a sanding pole. Then sand horizontally along the baseboard and ceiling. Don’t put a lot of pressure on the sanding pole or the head can flip over and damage the wall. Sand woodwork with a sanding sponge to get into crevices.

Use Tinted Primer

Before the pros paint walls, they fill holes and patch cracks with joint compound. But if you paint directly over it, the compound will suck the moisture out of the paint, giving it a flat, dull look (a problem called “flashing”). Those spots will look noticeably different than the rest of the wall. To avoid that, pros prime the walls before painting. Instead of using white primer, pros usually have it tinted gray or a color that’s similar to the finish paint. Tinted primer does a better job of covering the existing paint color than plain primer, so your finish coat will be more vibrant and may require fewer coats. This is especially true with colors like red or orange, which could require three or more coats without a primer.

Press Tape With a Putty Knife

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Nothing is more discouraging when you’ve finished painting than to peel tape off the woodwork and discover the paint bled through. To avoid the pain-in-the-neck chore of scraping off the paint, do a thorough job of adhering the tape before you start. “Apply tape over the wood, then run a putty knife over the top to press down the tape for a good seal,” a painter with more than 16 years of experience says. “That’ll stop any paint bleeds.” Use the blue painter’s tape instead of masking tape. Masking tape can leave behind a sticky residue that’s hard to clean off. Plus, paint can cause the tape to buckle or get wavy, which lets paint run underneath it. Painter’s tape can be left on for days (some up to two weeks) and still peel off cleanly. And it stops paint bleed without buckling.

Scrape a Ridge in Textured Ceilings

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The problem with painting along the edge of textured ceilings is that it’s almost impossible to get a straight line along the top of the wall without getting paint on the ceiling bumps. Pros have a simple solution. They run a screwdriver along the perimeter of the ceiling to scrape off the texture. “This lets you cut in without getting paint on the ceiling texture,” one of our pros says. “The screwdriver creates a tiny ridge in the ceiling, so the tips of your paint bristles naturally go into it. And you’ll never even notice the missing texture.”

Use Canvas Drop Cloths

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Source: popularmechanics.com

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