Easily Join Aluminum Plates and Repair Aluminum Parts Without Welding. The Resulting Is Extremely Strong!

How To Easily Join Together Aluminum Plates & Repair Aluminum Parts — electronicsNmore. These days, more and more parts are being replaced with aluminum parts. Why? Aluminum is lightweight, durable, and inexpensive in comparison with other metals. 

This excellent video will show you ‘How To Easily Join Together Aluminum Plates & Repair Aluminum Parts’. It was created by YouTube user ‘electronicsNmore’.

 

This video demonstrates how well Aluminum brazing rods work at joining aluminum plates, and parts together. The resulting joint/repair is extremely strong if done correctly(Must be super clean and well brushed). The brand used in this video is Alumite. Repair your own radiators, windows, or engine parts that have cracked. For cracks, simply drill out the ends of the cracks to stop them from spreading, grind the crack below the surface, then proceed as shown in this video.

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21 thoughts on “Easily Join Aluminum Plates and Repair Aluminum Parts Without Welding. The Resulting Is Extremely Strong!

  • March 9, 2015 at 1:49 pm
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    what was used for the gas mapp or propane or other gas?? Where can you get the rods and are they brazing rods for aluminum ??

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    • April 14, 2017 at 7:57 pm
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      Welding is a fabrication or sculptural process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing fusion, which is distinct from lower temperature metal-joining techniques such as brazing and soldering, which do not melt the base metal.

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  • April 2, 2015 at 3:46 pm
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    brazing is not welding you don’t melt the parent material just like soldering…Bill Fridley, so don’t call people morons.

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    • April 17, 2017 at 8:05 pm
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      Welding is the bonding of two objects together. No matter how you do it. I can weld two ice cubes together. Bonding together, is welding…….

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    • April 10, 2017 at 8:41 am
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      No, it isn’t. The parent metals are not FUSED, they are JOINED. Not one piece of metal, but still two.

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    • April 17, 2017 at 5:27 am
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      Not by the American Welding society definitions.

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  • April 4, 2015 at 4:55 am
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    I’ve done this many times. When done correctly you can’t break the weld.

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  • April 30, 2015 at 6:21 am
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    I have done this a few times. Works well. The brazing alloy in my experience is a different color than the parent aluminum so keep that in mind if you are blending and polishing a piece for appearance. I would also suggest the eutectic (low temp) brazing alloys have less tensile strength than the parent material so this is not the preferred way for a stress part welding. I would suggest TIG and then MIG welding for stress parts. My 2 cents.

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  • April 9, 2017 at 9:32 am
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    I am a potter and need a torch like that for post reduction firing what was the torch and where to get one.

    Reply

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